NC State Extension Publications Numbered Publications, Factsheets, Hard Copy Documents, Authoritative Sources & more …

Notify me when new publications are added.

Browse by Author: Kim Powell
Ordered by popularity

Roses for North Carolina

By: Kim Powell Horticulture Information Leaflets

Sooner or later most home gardeners think about growing roses. Landscape uses are quite varied because of the many different types of roses. They can be mass planted in beds, used as specimen or trained plants, planted as screens or hedges, or located near fences or arbors and allowed to climb. Several miniature cultivars can even be used as a ground cover or as edging material. Roses are available in almost any color imaginable and are suited to a number of sites.

A Simple Intermittent Mist System For Propagation

By: Ted Bilderback, Kim Powell, R.E. Bir Horticulture Information Leaflets

Sophisticated propagation structures are not always required to successfully root ornamental plants. Summer propagation of many woody ornamentals can be accomplished by rooting softwood or semi-hardwood shoots in inexpensive frames equipped with an intermittent mist system. During high summer temperatures, leafy soft shoots root more readily if structures are equipped with mist.

Hints for Fall-Planted Spring and Early Summer Flowering Bulbs

By: Kim Powell, A.A. De Hertogh, P.V. Nelson Horticulture Information Leaflets

This publication offers guidelines on planning a garden and buying bulbs, as well as planting planting techniques to ensure healthy flowers.

Summer and Fall Flowering Bulbs for the Landscape

By: August De Hertogh, Kim Powell Horticulture Information Leaflets

Summer and fall flowering bulbs provide another dimension to gardening. They add beauty and interest to the landscape and, since most of them are tender, they offer a unique challenge to the gardener. There are a large number of different types of bulbs, offering variations in forms, fragrances, colors, and lasting brilliance which many summer annuals cannot achieve.

Pruning Trees and Shrubs

By: Kim Powell

This publication for property owners and landscapers describes how to prune trees and shrubs properly, which results in attractive, healthy trees and shrubs.

Qualifiers for Quagmires: Landscape Plants for Wet Sites

By: Thomas Ranney, Richard Bir, Kim Powell, Ted Bilderback Horticulture Information Leaflets

Wet, poorly drained soils present one the most difficult challenges for growing plants in the landscape. Excessive moisture displaces oxygen in the soil and plant roots can suffocate as a result. Many plants are intolerant of having their roots submerged for extended periods of time. Even though standing water may not be present, poor drainage is often responsible for reduced growth and survival of plants in our landscapes.

Pruning Field Grown Shade and Flowering Trees

By: Ted Bilderback, Kim Powell, R.E. Bir Horticulture Information Leaflets

Every nurseryman should know how to prune trees and the reason for the various pruning practices. Many landscape problems can be avoided if correct pruning is performed, while the tree is growing in the nursery. Incorrect pruning practices or lack of pruning diminish the quality of the plant material.

Ornamental Grasses for North Carolina

By: Kim Powell Horticulture Information Leaflets

Ornamental grasses are becoming quite popular for North Carolina landscapes. Designers and gardeners realize the fine accent and architectural effect this group of plants contributes to a garden. As one applies the principles of good design — repetition, variety, balance, emphasis, sequence, and scale — along with the design qualities of color, texture, line and form, one appreciates the many uses and functions of ornamental grasses. (The term "ornamental grass" is really a catchall term used to describe all grasslike plants. These would include sedges, reeds, rushes, and a wide host of others.)

Urban Trees for Use under Utility Lines

By: Thomas Ranney, Richard Bir, Kim Powell Horticulture Information Leaflets

Selecting trees for use under utility lines presents a unique challenge. It is often desirable to have trees that are large enough to provide shade, architectural effects, and ornamental features, all without interfering with overhead utility lines. In this publication, we have listed trees that have a typical mature height of less than 30 feet.