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Non-Honey Bee Stinging Insects in North Carolina

By: David Tarpy, Joseph Flowers, Michael Waldvogel

This article describes and defines the different types of insects that sting and are also often mistaken for honey bees.

Washing and Sanitizing Kitchen Items

Disaster Recovery

This factsheet offers instructions for cleaning and sanitizing kitchen dishes, utensils, and cooking implements after a flood.

Carolina Lawns: A Guide to Maintaining Quality Turf in the Landscape

By: Grady Miller, Charles Peacock, Arthur Bruneau, Fred Yelverton, James P. Kearns, Rick Brandenburg, Dan C. Bowman, Richard J. Cooper, Matt Martin

This comprehensive guide offers information on different grasses for North Carolina lawns, as well as how to establish, care for, maintain, and renovate a new lawn.

Central North Carolina Planting Calendar for Annual Vegetables, Fruits, and Herbs

By: Lucy Bradley, Chris Gunter, Julieta Sherk, Liz Driscoll

In central North Carolina almost any type of vegetable or fruit can be grown successfully provided you choose appropriate varieties and plant at the right time. This publication covers climate, season and potential pests that all affect the selection of what and when to plant. Also included is a planting chart and calendar.

Butterflies in Your Backyard

By: Christopher Moorman, Jeffrey Pippen, John Connors, Nick Haddad, Mark Johns, Jesse Perry, Liessa Thomas Bowen Urban Wildlife

You can attract the many butterflies found throughout North Carolina to your backyard by following the simple practices described in this publication.

Producing Tree Fruit for Home Use

By: Michael Parker

This publication explains how to plant and take care of fruit trees in the home garden or yard.

Reptiles and Amphibians in Your Backyard

By: Christopher Moorman, Jill Anderson, Jeffrey Beane, Jeffrey Hall Urban Wildlife

As urban development continues to expand across the state, it is important that North Carolinians recognize the value of reptile and amphibian populations and learn how to conserve them.

Africanized Honey Bees: Where Are They Now, and When Will They Arrive in North Carolina?

By: David Tarpy Africanized Honey Bees

This factsheet outlines the history, movement, distribution, and present status of the Africanized honey bee in the United States. (Part 1 of a 3-part series)

Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases

By: Michael Waldvogel, Charles Apperson Biting and Stinging Pests

This publication will help you identify the several species of ticks found in North Carolina and the diseases they transmit. It also describes chemical and non-chemical ways you can protect yourself from ticks outdoors and control ticks in and around your home.

Raising Earthworms Successfully

By: Rhonda Sherman

This publication discusses how to set up a worm-growing business.

Disease Management and Guidelines for the Honey Bee

By: David Tarpy, Jennifer Keller

It is the goal of every beekeeper to maintain healthy, productive colonies. This can only be accomplished by reducing the frequency and prevalence of disease within beehives. The following is an outline of recommendations for detecting and treating colonies for economically important parasites and pathogens of honey bees so that beekeepers may achieve this goal, and do so in a sustainable way for the long-term health of their colonies.

A Gardener's Guide to Fertilizing Trees and Shrubs

By: Ervin Evans

This publication provides basic information on the nutrient needs of trees and shrubs, types of fertilizers to apply and recommended methods and times of application.

When the Power Is Out - When to Refreeze Frozen Food and When to Throw It Out

By: Benjamin Chapman Disaster Recovery

This factsheet offers information on which frozen foods can be safely refrozen after an extended power outage.

Water-Damaged Carpets and Rugs

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers general guidelines for cleaning or replacing flood-damaged carpets and rugs.

Worms Can Recycle Your Garbage

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This factsheet explains how you can set up and maintain a worm composting bin for your home or office. Worm composting reduces the amount of material that ends up in the landfill and provides compost that can enrich the soil.

How to Become a Beekeeper in North Carolina

By: David Tarpy, Jennifer Keller

Beekeeping is a very enjoyable and rewarding pastime that is relatively inexpensive to get started. Moreover, it’s a hobby that can eventually make you money! The following is a primer on how to start your first hive and begin keeping bees.

How Your Business Can Cut Costs by Reducing Waste

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This factsheet for business owners describes North Carolina waste reduction programs that can benefit a business. It includes some recommended practices for reducing waste and a list of organizations that can provide information and assistance in planning and conducting a waste reduction and recycling program.

Africanized Honey Bees: Prevention and Control

By: David Tarpy Africanized Honey Bees

This factsheet provides basic information about prevention and control of Africanized honey bees prior to their expected arrival in North Carolina. (Part 2 of a 3-part series.)

Backyard Composting of Yard, Garden, and Food Discards

By: Rhonda Sherman

This publication describes how to build and maintain a composting pile to use the compost in your yard or garden.

How to Salvage Flood-Damaged Appliances

Disaster Recovery

This publication covers items to consider when trying to salvage flood-damaged appliances.

Selecting and Managing Lawn Grasses for Shade

By: Arthur Bruneau, William Lewis, L. T. Lucas, M. A. Powell, Rick Brandenburg, Ronald E. Sneed, Joseph M. DiPaola, Charles Peacock

Turfgrass, trees, and shrubs are desired in most landscapes because they are attractive and useful. Unfortunately, growing turfgrasses in the presence of trees and shrubs can be a formidable task because each plant group competes with the other for the light, water, and nutrients that are essential for survival and growth. The desired effects of trees sometimes make it difficult to grow turf. When trees and shrubs are used to provide screening and privacy, the reduced wind movement and sunlight often increase the chance for disease. Even so, homeowners can take steps to improve the performance of a lawn growing in shade.

Blackberries for the Home Garden

By: Gina Fernandez

This publication is a home gardener's guide to planting, maintaining and harvesting blackberries.

A Small Backyard Greenhouse for the Home Gardener

By: Mike Boyette, Ted Bilderback

This publication presents plans and instructions for an easily constructed greenhouse that costs approximately $100 and may be used for many purposes.

Collard Greens

By: Extension Master Gardener Volunteers, Linda Brandon, Jeannie Leonard, Lucy Bradley Grow It, Eat It

This series of publications provides information about how to grow, harvest, and prepare a variety of fruits and vegetables from your garden. Each publication features recipes, recommended uses, nutrition information, and more.

Water Requirements of North Carolina Turfgrasses

By: Grady Miller, Drew Pinnix, Garry Grabow, Charles Peacock

Water is an essential component for plant growth. In turfgrasses it comprises 75 to 90 percent of the fresh weight of the plant, and irrigation is a key cultural practice in turfgrass management. Only 1 percent of the water absorbed is utilized for metabolic activity. By considering the factors that contribute to water loss, turfgrass managers can devise effective irrigation plans for specific sites.

Managing Backyards and Other Urban Habitats for Birds

By: Christopher Moorman, Mark Johns, Liessa Bowen, John Gerwin Urban Wildlife

This publication describes how homeowners can create backyards and other urban habitats that attract a variety of songbirds.

When the Power Is Out - When to Save Refrigerated Food and When to Throw It Out

By: Benjamin Chapman Disaster Recovery

This factsheet offers information on which refrigerated foods to discard when the power is out for an extended period.

Flood-Damaged Furniture

Disaster Recovery

This publication discusses how to possibly restore furniture, including antiques, damaged by floodwaters.

Tips on Writing Turf Contracts and Landscape Specifications

By: Charles Peacock, Matt Martin

Maintenance contracts for turfgrass areas should be written to provide security for all parties involved. The person or company receiving services (the contractor) should be aware of everything it has agreed to and therefore is required to do. This publication provides basic guidelines on how to write a good contract regarding turfgrass maintenance.

Success of Women in Agritourism: She Will Get What She Wants

By: Ann Savage, Carla Barbieri, Susan Jakes, Duarte Morais

This publication examine's women's success in the agritourism industry through survey responses to help maximize the benefits of agritourism to farms and rural communities.

21. Youth, Community, and Therapeutic Gardening

By: Lucy Bradley

This Youth, Community, and Therapeutic Gardening Chapter from the Extension Gardener Handbook helps volunteers understand how these types of gardens can be sucessful and the steps needed to be an effective mentor.

Reconditioning Flood-Damaged Tractors

By: Gary Roberson Disaster Recovery

This publication offers information on how to clean and recondition tractors that have been submerged in floodwaters.

NC State Extension Master Gardener Program Guidelines

By: Lucy Bradley

This publication provides guidelines for the NC State Extension Master Gardener program, including how to become a Master Gardener volunteer.

Managing Diseases in the Home Vegetable Garden

By: Harry Duncan, Charles Averre

This publication gives guidelines that will help you obtain good yields of disease-free vegetables.

Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

Community gardens have been part of the American landscape since the mid-1700s. Today, community gardens continue to make positive contributions in neighborhoods across North Carolina. Winner of an American Society for Horticultural Science, Extension Division, 2017 Educational Materials Award, Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook is a practical guide to community gardening. Based on experience and research, it is packed with best practices, tested strategies, and useful checklists. The guide covers every step in the community gardening process, from starting a new garden to sustainable long-term garden management and policy. Whether you are new to community gardening or a seasoned veteran, Collard Greens and Common Ground will help your community garden flourish.

How to Prune Specific Plants

By: Barbara Fair, Lucy Bradley, Anthony LeBude Pruning Trees & Shrubs

This final publication in the Pruning Trees & Shrubs series gives tips for pruning specific plants.

A Gardener's Guide to Soil Testing

By: Ervin Evans, Deanna Osmond

This publication tells gardeners why they should test their soil, how to obtain a soil test and interpret the results and how to use the soil test to improve their soils.

Building Local Food Economies: A Guide for Governments

By: Emily Edmonds, Rebecca Dunning, Taylor Smith

This publication serves as a guide on building local food economies for planners, economic developers, and local government professionals.

Asparagus

By: Extension Master Gardener Volunteers, Linda G. Brandon, Jeannie Leonard, Lucy Bradley Grow It, Eat It

This series of publications provides information about how to grow, harvest, and prepare a variety of fruits and vegetables from your garden. Each publication features recipes, recommended uses, nutrition information, and more.

Spring-Flowering Bulbs: Trials in North Carolina

By: Paul Nelson

The North Carolina Agricultural Research Service tested selected tulip and daffodil (Narcissus spp.) cultivars for four years. Trials were conducted in three climate zones so that results could be extrapolated to most of the United States. This publication for gardeners explains how to prepare the site for planting, how to select the right cultivars, how to fertilize and provides the trial results for spring-flowering bulbs.

Rainwater Harvesting: Guidance for Homeowners

By: Bill Hunt, Matthew Jones Urban Waterways

A rainwater harvesting system captures stormwater runoff, often from a rooftop, and stores the water in a cistern for later use. In this guide for homeowners, the authors describe the components of a rainwater harvesting system and how they work together. Guidelines for choosing, sizing and installing the components are included.

Pruning Trees and Shrubs

By: Kim Powell

This publication for property owners and landscapers describes how to prune trees and shrubs properly, which results in attractive, healthy trees and shrubs.

Soil, Plots, and Planters

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 8 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, discusses soil management in community food gardens.

Container Garden Planting Calendar for Edibles in the Piedmont

By: Kim Richter, Lucy Bradley, Mark Kistler, Julie Sherk

This publication offers a guide to growing edible plants year-round in containers. Includes planting and harvest guides.

Barriers and Strategies to Connecting Urban Audiences to Wildlife and Nature: Results from a Multi-Method Research Project

By: Myron Floyd, Danielle Ross-Winslow, Eric Thompson, Natalie Sexton, Alia Dietsch, Katharine Conlon

This publication summarizes the findings of a research project aimed at understanding urban audiences, identifying barriers to engagement in wildlife-dependent recreation, and identifying strategies that the Service can implement to overcome these barriers.

Precision Agriculture Technology: How to Become a Commercial Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Pilot

By: Gary Roberson

This publication discusses flying unmanned aerial vehicles (drones, model aircraft) for commercial purposes. You'll learn about the requirements becoming a commercial UAV pilot and how to obtain a remote pilot certificate.

Growing Food

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 9 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, focuses on planting strategies and planting times for various crops in food gardens.

General Pruning Techniques

By: Barbara Fair, Lucy Bradley, Anthony LeBude Pruning Trees & Shrubs

This third in a series on pruning offers general tips on pruning most landscape plants.

Local Food Systems: Clarifying Current Research

By: Dara Bloom, Joanna Lelekacs, Rebecca Dunning Local Foods

This publication discusses the environmental, economic, health, and community benefits that local food systems provide to communities.

Who is Responsible for the Trees? A Citizen Guide to Trees in the Community

By: Robert Bardon, Brandon King

This publication provides guidance on who is responsible for the maintenance and care of public and private trees in a community.

Assessing Historical Significance and Use Potential of Buildings within Historic Districts: An Overview of a Measurement Framework Developed for Climate Adaptation Planning

By: Sandra Fatorić, Erin Seekamp

This publication discusses a pilot study considering 17 historic structures at Cape Lookout National Seashore. The study was performed develop guidance and methods to help inform climate adaptation planning for cultural resources.

Direct to Food Bank and Food Pantry Donations

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, discusses food donations given directly to food banks and food pantries in North Carolina.

Africanized Honey Bees: Some Questions and Answers

By: David Tarpy, John T. Ambrose Africanized Honey Bees

This factsheet answers basic questions about Africanized honey bees. (Part 3 of a 3-part series)

Appendix H. Community Gardening Resources

By: Mary Jac Brennan, Susan Jakes

This appendix is part of the Extension Gardener Handbook and gives users to the tools to implement a youth, community, or therapeutic garden.

IV. NC State Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Policies

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines covers policies of the Master Gardener program.

Hurricane Preparedness

By: Sarah Kirby, Wilma Hammett Disaster Preparedness

The key to surviving a hurricane is preparation. This factsheet takes you through the thought process of what needs to be done before a storm so that you are prepared.

Tall Fescue & Kentucky Bluegrass Athletic Field Maintenance Calendar

By: Arthur Bruneau, Richard Cooper, Fred Yelverton, Henry Wetzel, Rick Brandenburg, Daniel Bowman, Charles Peacock, Cale A. Bigelow

This calendar of suggested management practices is designed to assist you in the seasonal care of your athletic field. Location, terrain, soil type and condition, age of field, previous management practices, and other factors affect turf performance. For these reasons, the following management practices and dates should be adjusted to suit your particular athletic field conditions.

Using Web Marketplaces to Reach Untapped Markets

By: Bruno Ferreira, Duarte Morais, Mary Lorscheider

This publication explains how microentrepreneurs can use emerging web-based marketplaces to sell services, goods, and experiences to untapped markets.

How to Create a Container Garden for Edibles in the North Carolina Piedmont

By: Kim Richter, Lucy Bradley, Mark Kistler, Julie Sherk

In this publication you will find ideas to get you started growing your own edibles. Included are simple designs and potential settings for a single container, a small group of containers and a larger grouping of containers. The benefits and challenges of various planting options will also be explored.

Appendix F. Social Media Policy

By: Lisa Sanderson, Lucy Bradley

This section of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides information about social media, particularly Facebook.

The Value of Honey Bees as Pollinators in North Carolina

By: David Tarpy

The impact of honey bees on not only North Carolina, but the entire world is immense.

Kitchen Cleanup After the Flood

By: Benjamin Chapman Disaster Recovery

This publication covers steps to take to clean up your kitchen after a disaster or emergency.

Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide for North Carolina Cooperative Extension

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication provides information and success stories related to food banks, food pantries, food donation programs, and other resources for addressing food insecurity.

III. North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Training

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides an overview of Master Gardener training.

Storm Safety in High-Rise Buildings

Disaster Preparedness

Storm safety for managers and residents of high-rise buildings before and during a hurricane are covered in this factsheet.

II. North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Guidelines is an overview of the Master Gardener program in North Carolina.

Plant Selection for Extensive Green Roofs in the Research Triangle Area of North Carolina

By: Wenyan Fu, Julieta Sherk, Joe Neal

This publication describes the evaluation of plant survival and vigor on 11 extensive green roofs in the Research Triangle region of North Carolina and provides plant selection guidelines for future green roof installations.

Food Safety and Garden Health

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 10 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, discusses food safety when growing crops in a community garden, including pesticides, sanitation, and irrigation.

I. North Carolina Cooperative Extension

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Guidelines provides and overview of Extension in North Carolina.

Conservation Subdivision Handbook

By: Susan Moore, Steve Allen, Leslie Moorman, Christopher Moorman, Nils Peterson, George Hess

Conservation subdivisions (CSDs) are a design strategy that attempts to preserve undivided, buildable tracts of land as communal open space for residents. This publication serves as a guide for the use of conservation design for land use planning. It covers the benefits of conservation subdivisions, barriers to its implementation in North Carolina and a case study in Orange County.

North Carolina Women’s Success in Agritourism: Turning Challenges into Opportunities

By: Mirza Farzana Halim, Carla Barbieri, Susan Jakes, Duarte Morais

This publication presents the results of interviews with women in agritourism across North Carolina. It discusses the successes, challenges, and opportunities these women face in the agritourism industry and offers conclusions on strategies to overcome challenges and improve success.

Community Supported Agriculture In North Carolina

By: Jeanine Davis, Melissa Ann Brown Horticulture Information Leaflets

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a form of direct marketing in which a community of individuals pledges to support a farm. At the beginning of the growing season, CSA members pay for a subscription to the CSA. In return, farmers provide the members with a weekly share of the harvest. Both growers and consumers have found this relationship to be mutually beneficial. Members receive a variety of fresh, local produce and have the satisfaction of knowing where their food comes from and how it is produced. Farmers, in turn, benefit by receiving funds upfront to buy seeds and inputs. They also are relieved of most of the task of marketing by having a guaranteed market and price for what they will produce.

Nest Structures for Mourning Doves

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains how to build, place and monitor a suitable nesting structure for mourning doves.

Stormwater Wetland Design Update: Zones, Vegetation, Soil, and Outlet Guidance

By: Bill Hunt, Jason Wright, Mike Burchell, Kris Bass Urban Waterways

These new design guidelines for stormwater wetlands focus on four design points: internal wetland zones, herbaceous plants that thrive in stormwater wetlands, a proper growing medium, and the importance of a flexible outlet structure and its construction.

Food Garden Design

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 4 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, discusses step-by-step methods for designing a new community food garden.

Master Gardener Volunteers and Community / Home Gardens

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, discusses using community and home gardens to supplement food for food banks and pantries in North Carolina.

Livestock and Poultry Buildings After the Flood

By: James Barker, Gerald Baughman, Robert Bottcher, Robert Evans, Roberto Munilla, Mark Rice, Ronald Sheffield, Philip Westerman, Morgan Morrow, Jesse Grimes Disaster Recovery

This publication offers a checklist for farmers to ensure the safety and security of poultry and livestock, as well as the buildings that house them, after a flood or other disaster.

Introduction: Food Banks and Food Pantries

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, describes food banks and food pantries and their role in North Carolina.

Composting: A Guide to Managing Organic Yard Wastes

By: Ted Bilderback, Larry Bass, Kim Powell

This eight-page publication explains how you can build and maintain a compost pile to manage organic yard waste at home.

Gleaning

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, discusses the process of gleaning in North Carolina.

How to Organize a Community Garden

By: Lucy Bradley, Keith Baldwin

This publication covers the keys to a successful community garden of individual plots including forming a strong planning team, choosing a safe site accessible to the target audience with sunlight and water, organizing a simple transparent system for management and designing and installing the garden. Appendices offer a sample layout, sample by-laws, sample budgets and a list of resources.

Grapes and Berries for the Garden

By: Barclay Poling, Gina Fernandez, R. A. Allen

This guide provides home gardeners with instructions for growing strawberries, blueberries, brambles (blackberries and raspberries), and grapes.

Composting at NC Residential and Summer Camps

By: Rhonda Sherman, Eric Caldwell

Residential camps generate food scraps from meal preparation, plate scrapings, and leftover or spoiled food. Many camps have horses, resulting in manure to manage. Composting and vermicomposting are viable options for managing food scraps, horse manure, and other types of organic waste materials.

How Beneficial is Agritourism? North Carolina Farmers and Residents Respond

By: Shuangyu Xu, Carla Barbieri, Samantha Rozier-Rich, Erin Seekamp, Duarte Morais

Agritourism, defined as activities offered on working farms and other agricultural settings for entertainment or educational purposes, has been increasing over the last ten years. Despite its growth, there is uncertainty about the benefits that agritourism brings to society, especially to rural communities. Understanding the benefits of agritourism is essential to further develop this recreational activity and to strengthen marketing efforts to attract more visitors to farms. To document perceptions of the socio-cultural, environmental, and economic benefits of agritourism, an online survey was conducted in 2010 among North Carolina agritourism providers (“farmers”) and a non-random panel of current and potential visitors (“residents”).

Water Quality for Golf Course Superintendents and Professional Turf Managers

By: Arthur Bruneau, B. C. Williams, L. T. Lucas, Charles Peacock, D. C. Bowman Water Quality & Turfgrass Area Development

Follow the suggestions and BMPs described in this publication to reduce sediment and keep nutrients and pesticides applied to turf from contaminating North Carolina's water resources.

Venison Donation Programs

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, discusses venison donation programs in North Carolina.

Residential and Industrial Pests

By: Michael Waldvogel Crop Profiles for North Carolina Agriculture

How to manage pesticides to control residential and industrial insects, diseases, and other pests in North Carolina is covered in detail.

4-H Chicken Donation: Embryology to Harvesting

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, discusses 4-H projects that raise and harvest chickens for local food pantries in North Carolina.

Options for Backyard Stream Repair

By: Wendi Hartup, Mitch Woodward, Bill Lord, Mike Burchell, Barbara Doll

This publication discusses strategies and techniques for stabilizing stream banks where erosion is an issue.

Community Backyard Composting Programs Can Reduce Waste and Save Money

By: Rhonda Sherman

This publication describes how communities can develop and implement backyard composting programs that reduce the amount of waste in the landfill and return nutrients to the soil.

Getting Started

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 2 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, guides readers through several initial steps in starting a community garden.

Food Recovery and Waste Reduction

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

Increasingly, food service managers are choosing to recover and reuse food scraps and other organic materials instead of throwing them away. This publication was developed to assist businesses and institutions with food recovery and waste reduction efforts. Businesses that could benefit include restaurants, bakeries, grocery stores, caterers, food distributors and vendors, produce markets, food processing plants, and any business or institution operating a cafeteria, such as hospitals, prisons, adult homes, colleges or schools, hotels, and ski resorts. Food recovery methods discussed include donating edible food to donor programs, giving food scraps to local livestock farmers, composting, and vermicomposting.

Appendix A. Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Position Classifications and Descriptions

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides descriptions of the various Master Gardener position classifications.

Protecting and Retaining Trees: A Guide for Municipalities and Counties in North Carolina

By: Robert Bardon, Brandon King

Learn how communities across North Carolina can protect and retain trees. This guide is based on a statewide review of municipal and county land use and tree protection regulations. The authors provide examples of ordinances in North Carolina that regulate tree removal, maintenance and replacement. They also discuss enforcement, incentives and alternatives and common tree conservation issues that NC communities face.

Funding and Resources

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 11 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, offers information on fundraising, dues, and grants.

Introduction

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 1 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, offers an introduction to and overview of community gardening.

Organization

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 6 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, discusses the organization of the community garden, including roles and responsibilities.

Designing Stormwater Wetlands for Small Watersheds

By: Bill Hunt, Barbara Doll Urban Waterways

This publication focuses on stormwater wetlands: their function, effectiveness, design,advantages and liabilities and costs.

Estate Plan Documents Explained

By: Ted Feitshans, Carolyn Bird, Mark Megalos Estate Planning in North Carolina

Preparing an estate plan requires more than a will. This publication describes the basic documents needed to prepare a comprehensive estate plan.

Agritourism, Farm Visits, Agro-Tourism Oh My! Do Farmers, Residents, and Extension Faculty Speak the Same Language?

By: Samantha Rozier-Rich, Shuangyu Xu, Carla Barbieri, Claudia Gil Arroyo

There is a need for a better understanding of what people mean when they say “agritourism,” so farmers can realize the full economic benefit of this activity. The authors of this publication conducted a study to discover the preferences of farmers, local residents (visitors or potential visitors), and extension faculty in North Carolina and Missouri with regard to labels for and definitions of agritourism, and to determine where common ground lies among these groups.

VI. North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Fund-Raising

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides information about generating revenue for Master Gardener programs.

V. North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Procedures

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides information on the Master Gardener procedures.

Site Preparation

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 5 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Garden Handbook, offers a step-by-step guide for preparing a new garden site.

Eat Smart Move More North Carolina: Growing Communities Through Gardens

By: Lucy Bradley, Keith Baldwin, Diane Beth

Gardens bring communities together. Not only are community gardens a good way to get more fresh fruits and vegetables in our diets, they also allow us to be active outdoors and build a strong community.

Tornado Safety for Schools

Disaster Preparedness

This publication offers information to safeguard children at schools during a tornado.

Management

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 7 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, offers users management tips for a community garden, including a seasonal maintenance calendar.

Appendix E. State and Local Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Associations

By: Lucy Bradley

This section of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides information about Master Gardener Volunteer associations.

Earthworm Composting

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains how to make a composting bin to house earthworms and recycle food scraps.

A Low-Cost Plastic Bottle and Jug Baler

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This publication shows how to build a simple, economical bale press and gives instructions on baling plastic bottles and jugs.

Troubleshooting

By: Don Boekleheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 13 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, offers strategies for dealing with common gardening problems in a community garden setting.

Appendix D: NC State Extension Master Gardener Program Volunteer Recertification Code of Conduct Form

By: Lucy Bradley

This section of the NC State Extension Master Gardener Program Guidelines provides information for Master Gardener volunteer recertification.

Bermudagrass Management in North Carolina

By: Paul Mueller, Jim Green, Rick Brandenburg, D. S. Chamblee, J. C. Burns, J. E. Bailey

This publication covers the different types of bermudagrass, uses of bermudagrasses, planting methods and the grasses' pests and diseases.

Appendix B. Examples of North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Roles

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides an overview of Master Gardener roles.

HACCP in Your School

By: Angie Fraser, Benjamin Chapman, Audrey Kreske, Michael Waldvogel, Patricia Alder

This manual covers Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP), a food safety plan for schools to reduce the likelihood of foodborne illness by handling food safely from the time it is received until the time it is served.

Water Quality and Turfgrass Area Development

By: Arthur Bruneau, Charles Peacock, Greg Jennings, L.T. Lucas, B.C. Williams Water Quality & Turfgrass Area Development

This publication introduces the permit and regulatory processes and provides a very general guide to the basics of good construction practices during turfgrass development areas.

Site Selection

By: Don Boekelheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 3 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, offers community garden organizers insight on choosing potential sites for a community food garden.

Food Pantry Produce Markets

By: Dara Bloom, Emily Gamble Local Foods

This publication, part of the Farm to Food Bank Resource Guide, discusses setting up a market or farm stand at a food pantry in North Carolina.

Your Estate Plan - Where to Begin

By: Ted Feitshans, Mark Megalos, Sreedevi Gummuluri, Guido van der Hoeven Estate Planning in North Carolina

To begin an estate plan, identify your goals and gather needed information before seeking professional advice. Schedule a family meeting to begin shaping your objectives. The checklist of estate objectives and other guidance in this publication will help you begin.

Appendix C: NC State Extension Master Gardener Program Student/Intern Code of Conduct Form

By: Lucy Bradley

This section of the NC State Extension Master Gardener Program Guidelines contains information for Master Gardener volunteer students and interns.

Using a Compass and Pacing

By: Robert Bardon Woodland Owner Notes

A compass and pacing can be useful in many different woodlot activities. A compass can indicate the direction you are headed relative to magnetic north, and pacing is a simple means of measuring linear distance by walking. This publication will help you use a compass to determine direction and determine your pace.

Hunting and Fishing Sportsmanship

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains basic rules for being a good sportsman while hunting or fishing on another’s property.

Handling and Cleaning up Damaged Pesticide Containers at Home

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers guidelines if a recent storm resulted in water damage to a pesticide container in your home.

Master Gardener Insect Guide for Ornamentals and Turf

By: James Baker, Rick Brandenburg

This comprehensive guide will help master gardeners diagnose many insect and mite problems and to decide whether to bring a particular problem to the attention of a county agent.

Water Quality and Home Lawn Care

By: Arthur Bruneau, S. C. Hodges, L. T. Lucas Water Quality & Turfgrass Area Development

This publication will help you care for your lawn in ways that prevent and reduce contamination of our water resources by sediment, fertilizers, and pesticides.

Beyond the Garden Gate

By: Don Boekleheide, Lucy Bradley

This publication, chapter 12 of Collard Greens and Common Ground: A North Carolina Community Food Gardening Handbook, offers advice for community gardeners to expand their involvement in the larger community.

Agritourism, Your Way

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

Agricultural tourism increases the potential for on farm sales with value-adding products and services, further diversifying the product line of the farm operation. There are three agritourism basics: have something for visitors to see, something for them to do and something for them to buy. There are many activities that can be incorporated into agritourism. Most successful ventures started with one idea, perfected it and then moved on to add the next idea. This diversification offers farmers benefits including increased revenue, an opportunity to educate the public, and a new way of marketing products and services. Agritourism offers tourists unique experiences, a connection with where their food comes from, and cultural or heritage experiences. Planning a successful agritourism enterprise includes: business planning, marketing, learning legal rules and regulations, assessing risk and safety considerations, and considering customer satisfaction.

Coalition Formation - How to Create a Coalition on Disaster Recovery Before a Disaster

By: Sarah Kirby Disaster Preparedness

What is a coalition and how can It help? A disaster recovery coalition is an organization of concerned citizens that advocates for services, policies and programs to accomplish specific goals that impact disaster recovery and prevention. A coalition monitors, analyzes and mobilizes community efforts. A local coalition may assume several roles.

Tornadoes

Disaster Preparedness

This publication offers information on preparation for tornado season in North Carolina.

Evacuating Safely

Disaster Preparedness

This publication covers the supplies needed for an evacuation due to an emergency or disaster, as well as a checklist of things to do before leaving your house.

Tools to Make the Cut

By: Barbara Fair, Lucy Bradley, Anthony LeBude Pruning Trees & Shrubs

This second in a series on pruning offers tips on selecting the right tool for the job and for evaluating a tool’s quality.

Agritourism in North Carolina: Summary of Pilot Study Results

By: Shuangyu Xu, Samantha Rozier-Rich

Agritourism–defined in this study as any activity or service provided on a working farm with the purpose of attracting visitors–has grown in popularity due to structural changes affecting farmers and communities across the nation and throughout North Carolina. According to the North Carolina Rural Center, the number of farms in North Carolina has dramatically declined in recent years to just 17% of the total number of farms present in the 1940s. The changing economy, fluctuations in agricultural income, and farmers’ desire to preserve land and resources have pressured North Carolina farmers to examine alternative economic opportunities.

Baseball Field Layout and Construction

By: Grady Miller

Knowing a few basics and having some appropriate tools is all that is necessary before you can build your own baseball field. These illustrated instructions can be used to set up a baseball field on a relatively level, open area of ground.

Social Relationships Between Wineries and Local Communities: Perspectives of North Carolinians from the Piedmont

By: Jing Li, Shuangyu Xu, Mirza Farzana Halim, Carla Barbieri

This publication discusses the perspectives of locals in the North Carolina Triad with regard to social relationships between wineries and the communities.

Voluntary Conservation Options for Land Protection in North Carolina

By: Mark Megalos Woodland Owner Notes

Landowners share a deep connection to their land and the legacy they’ll leave behind. With so many conservation options to consider, landowners need to have a working knowledge of the choices to protect their land in the near and long term. Landowners should identify their goals before embarking upon a conservation strategy. Once a conservation strategy is selected, then the implications of state and federal taxes can be explored. This publication reviews the most common land conservation and protection options.

A Gardener's Guide to Protecting Water Quality

By: Ervin Evans, Deanna Osmond

This publication discusses ways that gardeners can protect water quality and avoid runoff and soil erosion.

Agritourism in North Carolina: Comparison of 2005 and 2012 Survey Results

By: Shuangyu Xu, Samantha Rozier-Rich

This publication compares a 2004/2005 report and a 2011/2012 report on agritourism in North Carolina. A comparison of the two reports demonstrates that agritourism continues to grow and thrive in North Carolina.

A Disaster Kit for Staying at Home

By: Sarah Kirby, Benjamin Chapman Disaster Preparedness

This publication covers the supplies you will need at home in the event of an emergency or disaster.

Considering an Agritourism Enterprise?

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

Agritourism – also known as farm tourism, agri-tainment, agricultural tourism, or agrotourism – has a long history in America. Because of the generation gap between farm and non-farm families, the demand for a slower paced farm experience has now become the catalyst for farm-based recreation to become an important business. Agritourism has become a tool that has a direct economic impact on farms and the surrounding communities.

Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

By: Bill Hunt, Bill Lord Urban Waterways

This publication presents maintenance guidelines for stormwater wetlands and wet ponds, two stormwater practices that are being constructed across North Carolina. Stormwater management practices must be kept in proper working order to maintain their intended functions and aesthetic appeal.

Myths and Facts About the National Flood Insurance Program

Disaster Preparedness

This publication clears up misconceptions about federal flood insurance and the National Flood Insurance Program.

Estuaries: Nature's Water Filters

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to build a model of a wetland and its functions or map how stormwater flows between their neighborhoods and the ocean.

Before You Recycle, Choose to Reuse

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This publication for individuals and groups describes how to reduce waste by reusing materials, including clothing and household items.

Managing Construction and Demolition Debris

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

Construction companies can follow state regulations as well as save money by reducing the amount of waste produced on-site and by reusing and recycling waste materials.

Tornado Preparedness

Disaster Preparedness

This publication covers how to spot a tornado, where to go during a storm and tornado survival rules and tips.

Eliminating Odors from Your Refrigerator

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers tips to rid your refrigerator of odors after an extended loss of power due to an emergency or disaster.

Regulations That May Affect Your Agritourism Enterprise

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

A wide variety of regulations may affect agritourism enterprise operations. The affect of regulations may depend on the type of attractions offered, location of the enterprise, whether employees are hired and a number of other factors specific to each enterprise. These regulations may be imposed at the federal, state and local levels of government. It is important to investigate all regulations applicable to your agritourism enterprise in order to avoid penalties, fines or interruptions to you business. This resource document provides an introduction to a number of regulations that may impact agritourism operations.

Reconditioning Flood-Damaged Farm Equipment

By: Gary Roberson Disaster Recovery

This publication offers information how to recondition farm equipment that has been submerged in floodwaters.

VII. Sources of Additional Information

By: Lucy Bradley

This chapter of the North Carolina Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program Guidelines provides additional information sources about the Master Gardener program.

A Landowner's Guide to Working with Recreationists

By: Ed Jones, Peter Bromley Woodland Owner Notes

With an increase statewide in outdoor activity, many landowners report unacceptable levels of trespass, littering, property damage and game law violations. This publication discusses (1) liability, (2) ethical standards for recreationists, (3) alternative ways of managing access to private lands, and (4) dealing with trespass.

Before the Cut

By: Barbara Fair, Lucy Bradley, Anthony LeBude Pruning Trees & Shrubs

This first of four publications in the Pruning Trees & Shrubs series introduces basic pruning concepts and key terms. Subsequent publications in the series provide more information on woody plant biology, necessary tools and pruning guidelines for general purposes and specific species.

Using Social Media to Market Agritourism

By: Susan Colucci, Samantha Rozier-Rich, Stacy Tomas, Jenny Carleo, Stephen Komar, Brian Schilling East Coast Agritourism Webinar Series

This factsheet is part of a series developed as a result of the East Coast Agritourism Webinar Series, a partnership between North Carolina State University and Rutgers University. Having an Internet presence is one of the most important marketing strategies for any business.

Fishing Bait

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains the different types of baits and lures and their effectiveness in attracting fish.

Heat Stress Disorders

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers safety tips and first aid procedures to prevent and treat heat stress disorders that may occur during clean-up after a hurricane or other disaster.

Waste Reduction and Recycling for the Lodging Industry

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This factsheet provides information on how hotels and motels can reduce waste and use recycling programs to economic advantage.

Promoting Your Agritourism Business

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

The basis of any promotional program is product excellence. If your product or operation is excellent, promotion will enhance your sales. If your product is poor, all the advertising in the world will not help. This publication offers some suggestions for promoting your agritourism business.

Conserving Working Lands: A Land Legacy Workbook with Tools and Resources to Guide Your Conservation Planning Journey

By: Susan Moore, Mark Megalos, Grizel Gonzalez-Jeuck

Your land is valuable to you and your family. Protection and successful transition begins with a flexible land conservation plan. A conservation plan describes your intentions and methods to achieve a desired outcome. To achieve your specific conservation vision, there are proven checkpoints to complete your journey. These checkpoints will result in a plan you can use to enroll your land in the conservation program(s) that meets your needs. Every plan may be unique but all will have the checkpoints of the journey in common. This handbook provides the recommended checkpoints to help begin your planning journey and simple tools to help you complete a working land conservation plan.

Urban Wood Waste: A Guide to Managing Your Community's Resource

By: Karla Heinen, Megan Lawler, Melissa McHale, Nils Peterson

Effective wood waste management programs address the wood waste created in a community by treating it as a usable, and sometimes marketable, product. Through careful reuse and recycling, a wood waste management program can decrease forest management costs and the illegal and environmentally harmful dumping of wood waste. This publication covers statutes and regulations governing wood waste, ways to reuse wood waste and developing a wood waste plan.

Water Quality and Professional Turfgrass Managers

By: Arthur Bruneau, L. T. Lucas Water Quality & Turfgrass Area Development

Although groundwater and surface waters are rarely polluted by turfgrass pesticides, turf managers should consider the potential for environmental contamination when choosing a pesticide.

Returning Home After a Disaster

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers tips to people returning to their homes and communities after evacuation during an emergency or disaster.

Priorities for Cleanup & Repair

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers a list of steps to take for cleanup and repair of your home following a disaster or emergency.

Dealing with Snakes After a Storm

Disaster Recovery

This publication offers tips to deal with snakes, both indoors and outdoors, during the recovery process of a flood or disaster with strewn debris.

Dealing with Potential Moisture Problems After a Flood

Disaster Recovery

This publication covers potential moisture problems in attics, crawl spaces and walls after a flood or other disaster.

Controlling Damage in Pesticide Storage Facilities on the Farm

Disaster Recovery

This publication for farmers covers the guidelines to deal with pesticide storage facilities that may have been damaged by a flood or other disaster.

Ornamental Sweetpotatoes for the Home Landscape

By: Dennis Carey, Brian Whipker, Lucy Bradley, Wayne Buhler

Ornamental sweetpotatoes are extremely heat-tolerant, tropical, perennial vines grown as annuals in North Carolina. They look great covering annual beds, hanging over walls or trailing from containers. This publication covers cultivars, how to select the plants, care through the growing season and pests and diseases.

Leaping Lizards

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains characteristics of lizards that distinguish them from other animals.

Tools for Archers

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains how to identify and locate household materials to recycle in the construction of archery equipment.

Monitoring Macroinvertebrates

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to collect and identify stream insects and other tiny invertebrates in a group outing.

Maximizing the Durability of Athletic Fields

By: Grady Miller

Durable athletic fields begin with sound construction and careful planning. Good management practices can increase a field's durability. The basic concepts presented in this guide can help field managers extend the usability of athletic fields.

Developing Successful Tree Ordinances

By: Robert Bardon, Mark Megalos, Amy Graul, Kevin Miller

This publication discusses how communities use tree ordinances as tools to protect trees, preserve green space and promote healthy, managed urban forests. To protect trees and prevent their loss in the urban environment, communities need to understand tree ordinances, their limitations and their proper implementation.

Pond Management: Good Fishing in the Balance

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to collect information on fish populations and evaluate it to determine management recommendations for ponds.

Marketing Your Agritourism Enterprise

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

Agritourism venues require a significant amount of planning, marketing, and promotion to create successful enterprises. The primary focus of all marketing and promotion activities is to inform potential visitors about the operation and its activities and to attract visitors to the farm. Marketing involves the identification of a potential customer’s needs and wants. This requires thorough planning and execution with focus on identifying a target audience and their needs, attracting the targeted audience to the farm, getting the targeted audience to spend their money by selling to their needs and wants, and creating an inviting environment that will cause the targeted audience to come back again. A marketing plan includes researching the potential market for the products, setting financial goals, establishing a marketing mix, developing a budget, monitoring customer response, making a contingency plan, and making a list of tasks necessary to put the plan into action.

North Shore Community Climate Readiness: Understanding Visitor Behaviors and Responses to Climate Change Projections

By: Allie McCreary, Erin Seekamp, Mae A. Davenport, Jordan W. Smith

This publication presents the findings from survey research with visitors to the North Shore tourism region along Lake Superior in Minnesota with the intention to to enhance tourism and recreation providers’ understanding of current visitor behaviors and how visitor behaviors may respond to various scenarios of climate change projected for the North Shore.

Bird Furniture

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explores the nesting and feeding requirements of birds and explains how to build nesting boxes.

Talking Turkey

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to recognize and record wild turkey vocalizations; then give an oral presentation discussing how turkeys communicate.

Communities Thrive on Trees

By: Robert Bardon, Kevin Miller, Mark Megalos

This brochure describes the economic, environmental and health benefits that urban trees provide to a community. It provides a list of organizations to contact for more information about urban forestry.

Choosing a Contractor

By: Sarah Kirby Disaster Recovery

This publication offers tips on choosing a contractor for home repairs after an emergency or disaster.

Traveling Safely by Car in an Emergency

Disaster Preparedness

This publication offers a checklist of items to ensure your car is in working order in the event of an evacuation during an emergency or disaster.

Beavers: Ecosystem Engineers

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explores studying beaver biology and behavior through inquiry-based learning strategies.

Risk Assessment and Management

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

What types of risk are you taking on when you engage in agritourism? The first risk normally thought of is liability. While liability is extremely important, other types of risk are also important for you to consider. To be successful, you must correctly assess and manage risk.

Animal Appetites

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explores food preferences in animals through inquiry-based learning strategies.

Organizing a Community Recycling Program

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This publication outlines key elements that local governments should consider when planning, implementing, publicizing and evaluating recycling programs.

Workplace Community Supported Agriculture: Connecting Local Farmers to Local Workplaces

By: Denise Finney, Nancy Creamer

This guide provides an overview of the community supported agriculture (CSA) program at Research Triangle Institute International (RTI). Filled with ideas, examples, and lessons learned from this workplace CSA pilot project, the guide provides information for farmers, businesses, Extension agents, and others who are considering starting a workplace CSA program.

Pools of Life

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains which bodies of water are suitable for amphibian growth and development.

Southeastern Serpents

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains how to identify snakes and their behavior in nature.

Butterfly Buffet

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to keep detailed records of butterfly observations and recommends which plants would be most beneficial to local butterflies.

Strategic Conservation Planning for the Eastern North Carolina/Southeastern Virginia Strategic Habitat Conservation Team

By: Louise Alexander-Vaughn, Jaime Collazo, C. Ashton Drew

The Eastern North Carolina/Southeastern Virginia Strategic Habitat Conservation Team (ENCSEVA) is a partnership among local federal agencies and programs with a mission to apply Strategic Habitat Conservation to accomplish priority landscape-level conservation within its geographic region. ENCSEVA seeks to further landscape-scale conservation through collaboration with local partners. To accomplish this mission, ENCSEVA is developing a comprehensive Strategic Habitat Conservation Plan (Plan) to provide guidance for its members, partners, and collaborators by establishing mutual conservation goals, objectives, strategies, and metrics to gauge the success of conservation efforts.

Qualifying and Quantifying Your Personal Agritourism Potential

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

There are a number of questions that must be asked and honestly answered when considering whether to start and operate an agritourism operation. For example, you should evaluate factors such as personal characteristics and skills, target markets, market potential, land and property resources and characteristics, individual and family goals, time and labor considerations, and financial needs and resources. An honest evaluation of these factors will help you understand your potential for success.

Nature's Footprints

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 explains how to identify a wide variety of animal tracks.

Deciding How to Structure Your Business

By: Ted Feitshans

This publication provides basic information about the forms of business organizations (corporations, partnerships, etc.) available in North Carolina.

Houses for Wood Ducks

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to collect used materials, construct and strategically place nest boxes for wood ducks.

Wild Game: From Field to Table

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to properly handle, store, dress and prepare wild game or fish.

Would You Like To Be a Wildlife Professional?

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains the physical and technical skills expected of entry-level wildlife and fishery biologists and/or law enforcement officers, and explains how to evaluate personal abilities along with educational and vocational needs and opportunities.

Customer Service

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

Customer service encompasses many things including appearance of your operation, reception the customer receives, knowledge of your employees, accuracy of directions and ease of accessibility. While satisfied customers will provide repeat business and attract more customers to your business, dissatisfied customers won't return and they may discourage potential customers from visiting your business. Steps to improve customer service include: developing a written customer plan, identifying your customers, and determining what it will take to satisfy them. If you fall short of full satisfaction, you need to know how to correct the problem as soon as possible.

Enhancing Rural Tourism Networks Factsheet

By: Jennifer Iyengar, Erin Seekamp

This publication discusses a study conducted to explore how rural tourism networks are organized and utilized by tourism entrepreneurs and support agencies.

Deconstruction: Giving Old Buildings New Lives

By: Rhonda Sherman Water Quality & Waste Management

This factsheet summarizes the advantages and challenges of deconstructing old buildings and reusing the materials. It includes a list of businesses that buy used building materials.

Should You Buy Flood Insurance?

Disaster Preparedness

This publication discusses the National Flood Insurance Program, as well as a flood insurance policies from insurance companies.

Turtle Tales

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 9-12 offers information about turtles and their role in nature.

Farming for Wildlife

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to plant food plots and manipulate the seed bank to improve food resources for white-tailed deer and other wildlife species.

Community Service

By: Kent Wolfe, Gary Bullen A How-To Guide for Successful Agritourism Enterprises

Good owners and managers of businesses are very involved with their communities. They volunteer to help rather than waiting to be asked. They look for good community causes and then work to develop good relationships with others who support those causes. Successful business people look for the needs within the community, and ways in which they can assist. Your purpose is to help your community. However, as a result of your commitment, wonderful opportunities often present themselves. Through your community involvement, you can also maximize your business's exposure.

Sharing Space with Wildlife

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to identify nuisance wildlife situations and make recommendations for minimizing damage.

National Flood Insurance Programs

Disaster Preparedness

This publication offers some information about the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Urban Wildlife: Our Animal Neighbors

Youth Wildlife Projects

This educational resource for children aged 13-15 explains how to observe urban wildlife, record information and use findings to develop a wildlife habitat improvement plan.